FAQ: Are your products regulated?

FAQ: Are your products regulated?

One of the questions I am asked is: Are your products regulated?

Absolutely! True soap, as defined by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is regulated by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), not the FDA. However, based on the intended use of “cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance (of the human body)” our soap is actually regulated as a cosmetic and falls under the requirements of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) under the authority of the FDA.  In addition, the labeling requirements for our products are governed by the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA). The FPLA was passed by Congress in 1966 to protect consumers and gives authority to the FDA to regulate food, drug, and cosmetics. We also voluntarily comply with the FDA’s guidelines for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP).

 

Mountain Girl Soap GMP

 

 

 

Whew, that's a lot of rules! The regulations can get confusing at times but we take them seriously so you don’t have to think about them. Our compliance with the law means that, even as a small maker-business, we have standards to assure the quality and consistency of our products from our hands to your yours.

 




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